Alexander
Aizenshtat


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About artist:

Alexander Aizenshtat was born in 1951 in Moscow. He studied at the famous Serov Art School in Prechistenka Street in the late 60s, continuing his studies in the studio of artist Skulskiy in the early 70s. In 1974, he emigrated to Israel, where he lived in the city of Safed and in the kibbutz of Manheim, and the picturesque outskirts inspired his creativity. Having served in the army, Aizenshtat started studying Torah and Talmud in a Yeshiva in Jerusalem. In 1980, Aizenshtat got married and moved to Paris. In 1989, he founded the Center for Torah Studies in Moscow. Alexander Aizenshtat followed Orthodox Jewish practice for much of his life, keeping the requirements strictly.

Alexander Aizenshtat's works can be found in Moscow Museum of Modern Art and in private collections throughout the world, including those of Aaron Frenkel, David Nahmad, Nicolas Sarkozy, Dmitry Medvedev and the Prince of Monaco, Albert II.

In 2016, works by Alexander Aizenshtat were exhibited in the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts. The curators were Irina Antonova, Museum President, and Andrey Tolstoy, Director of the Research Institute of Theory and History of Fine Arts of the Russian Academy of Arts (RAKh). The latter noted that "Alexander is a man with a gift of genius, having all the abilities of painting, coloring, and composition."

In November 2016, an exhibition of Aizenshtat's works took place in the Tretyakov Gallery on Krymsky Val. Zelfira Tregulova, the Director of the Tretyakov Gallery, a fine art expert, and the curator of the exhibition, observed the "great dramatic expression" of the artist's works, with his typical complex references to the heritage of both European expressionism and the Russian artistic tradition, together with the vast experience of the 20th century.

The art of Alexander Aizenshtat attracts attention from major fine art experts and art historians. To the Doctor of Fine Arts and academician at RAKh Alexander Yakimovich, the works of Aizenshtat's resemble those of Rembrandt in the force of impact and the profundity of artistic images. In his article for "Collection. Art and Culture" Journal, he states that Alexander Aizenshtat is an "enigmatic artist, who never fails to amaze."

"In the history of world art, every stage had prominent artists, who cannot be compared," Irina Antonova says. "Alexander Aizenshtat does not follow somebody's school, but creates a world of his own." Professor Andrey Lvovich Yurganov even identifies Alexander Aizenshtat as the founder of a new movement in world fine arts - metaphysical expressionism.

Alexander
Aizenshtat


Wikipedia
Facebook
About artist:

Alexander Aizenshtat was born in 1951 in Moscow. He studied at the famous Serov Art School in Prechistenka Street in the late 60s, continuing his studies in the studio of artist Skulskiy in the early 70s. In 1974, he emigrated to Israel, where he lived in the city of Safed and in the kibbutz of Manheim, and the picturesque outskirts inspired his creativity. Having served in the army, Aizenshtat started studying Torah and Talmud in a Yeshiva in Jerusalem. In 1980, Aizenshtat got married and moved to Paris. In 1989, he founded the Center for Torah Studies in Moscow. Alexander Aizenshtat followed Orthodox Jewish practice for much of his life, keeping the requirements strictly.

Alexander Aizenshtat's works can be found in Moscow Museum of Modern Art and in private collections throughout the world, including those of Aaron Frenkel, David Nahmad, Nicolas Sarkozy, Dmitry Medvedev and the Prince of Monaco, Albert II.

In 2016, works by Alexander Aizenshtat were exhibited in the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts. The curators were Irina Antonova, Museum President, and Andrey Tolstoy, Director of the Research Institute of Theory and History of Fine Arts of the Russian Academy of Arts (RAKh). The latter noted that "Alexander is a man with a gift of genius, having all the abilities of painting, coloring, and composition."

In November 2016, an exhibition of Aizenshtat's works took place in the Tretyakov Gallery on Krymsky Val. Zelfira Tregulova, the Director of the Tretyakov Gallery, a fine art expert, and the curator of the exhibition, observed the "great dramatic expression" of the artist's works, with his typical complex references to the heritage of both European expressionism and the Russian artistic tradition, together with the vast experience of the 20th century.

The art of Alexander Aizenshtat attracts attention from major fine art experts and art historians. To the Doctor of Fine Arts and academician at RAKh Alexander Yakimovich, the works of Aizenshtat's resemble those of Rembrandt in the force of impact and the profundity of artistic images. In his article for "Collection. Art and Culture" Journal, he states that Alexander Aizenshtat is an "enigmatic artist, who never fails to amaze."

"In the history of world art, every stage had prominent artists, who cannot be compared," Irina Antonova says. "Alexander Aizenshtat does not follow somebody's school, but creates a world of his own." Professor Andrey Lvovich Yurganov even identifies Alexander Aizenshtat as the founder of a new movement in world fine arts - metaphysical expressionism.